Mirror, Mirror . . .

September 26, 2011

My life reflects my beliefs and my consistent thoughts.  My powerful mind produces for me what I believe and gives me what I focus on.

When I look in a mirror I see me. I see me reflected back at me.  When I look at my life I see my consistent thoughts and beliefs reflected back at me.  

We reap what we sow.

If we don’t like what we see in our life, we must sow different seeds.  We must focus our consistent thoughts and pictures on what we want in our life, not what we don’t want. Our focus must be on the affirmative, not the negative.

If our life reflects sadness, anxiety and/or lack, guest what? We are sowing those seeds.

If we want our life to reflect joy, happiness and abundance, guess what? We need to start sowing consistent thoughts and visions of joy, happiness and abundance.

Use your skills to change what is reflected in your life.

 by Michael Price

Categories: Attitude, Leadership, Personal development.

The Joy of Creative Labor

September 5, 2011

In the U.S., this is our “Labor Day” weekend, a time when we generally do our best to avoid anything that looks like work.  Many will go camping, spend the day at the beach, or perhaps at a family picnic.

Unfortunately, very few will pause to be thankful for the work they do.  Only a handful will take time to honor and acknowledge the joy of work, and I find that very sad.

Too many of us believe “work” is something to be avoided, and these people wish for a path to instant wealth, because then they would “never work again.” I suspect that’s one reason the universe makes sure most of them never acquire that kind of instant wealth! I see work as a great honor and source of fulfillment, although I admit there is both “good” work and “bad” work.

“Bad” work is something for which we are not suited, or which we do for the wrong motives. For me, “bad” work would be trying to earn a living as a musician.  My brother plays cello for the Jacksonville symphony, and for him, music is the work of the angels.  He was blessed with great talent and he loves it.  I can’t carry a tune in a bucket, and when I was a kid, piano lessons were a lot of “work” for me, my parents, and Mrs. Bystrom, my long-suffering piano teacher.

Doing work for which we are ill-suited, it seems to me, is so stressful that it borders on the immoral.  Life is meant to be lived, to be joyful, and to be productive.  Doing “work” we hate gives honorable work a bad name.

As I see it, work is our chance to partner with God in the creation of a better, richer, more exciting world.  Work is our opportunity to build, to create, to leave our footprints in the sands of time.  Work is our chance to say, “I was here, I made a difference and I left things better than I found them.”  That is work worth doing! 

Over the years, through my various jobs and hobbies, I’ve met wonderful people who reflected their life’s meaning and purpose in their work.  Some were artists in how they drove a delivery truck, others found joy in Police work, writing, doing therapy, or in construction.  One of my golfing partners loves teaching high school biology, and it shows in his attitude and in his student’s grades.

Vicki is a server at my favorite coffee shop. She has 3 kids, her husband is a chef, and for whatever reason, helping a couple hundred people start their day with hot coffee, a good breakfast and a smile is her calling in life.  She’s a treasure, and is loved by hundreds of loyal customers.

One of the wisest things anyone ever said to me is, “Find something you truly love to do, and you’ll never work another day the rest of your life.”  While I quibble with that disparaging definition of “work,” the point is essential.  In our technological age, we have the greatest freedom in history to find work that is perfect for us!

Work is a very personal thing.  It’s about combining your time and effort with your talents, skills and the situation around you to make things better.  It’s about making a difference.  It’s about making your contribution, and being productive. 

This Labor Day, give thanks for the work you do and the difference it makes.  Celebrate your contribution to your community and our world. And, if you are not doing the “perfect” job for you, pledge that by next year, you WILL be doing the right work.  Life is too short to spend it doing work for which you are not suited or passionate! You owe that to yourself and to the world.  We need your best stuff, your best effort, your passion and your unique genius.  We need Vicki’s smile at breakfast.

by Phil Humbert

Categories: Accountability, Attitude, Employee satisfaction, Leadership development, Personal development.

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