A Gift in Disguise

March 20, 2012

All of us have had, and continue to have people/situations/occurrences/events in our lives that we interpret as good or bad, happy or sad. We know how to handle the good and happy events in our lives. We enjoy!

In each event we interpret as bad or sad, there is a gift disguised as a problem. Each of us have had, and will periodically continue to have bad, sad or negative events/encounters in our lives. In each of those situations, there is a lesson for us to learn, an opportunity to grow.

We normally feel the emotion of the event, which is natural. However, many times we fail to learn the embedded lesson. Often, we continue to feel the emotion long past what is healthy for us. We re-live the situation over and over (Self-Talk).

It is said that we learn more from our mistakes than we do from our successes. If this is true, then we should view our mistakes or events in our lives as an opportunity to learn.

Certainly we need to feel the emotion. And the more severe the event, the longer we will naturally feel the emotion. However, at some point it is time to “Learn the Lesson” and move-on.

We are feeling beings. We are also problem solving beings with the gift of “Original Thought”. So, when the time is appropriate, we need to “Leave the Event” behind, and carry the lesson into our future. We can then put the lessons learned into our tool-box of experience to deal with future events.

By Michael Price

Categories: Attitude, Change management, Personal development.

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Sum Up Your Leadership in Six Words by John Baldoni

March 6, 2012

Once upon a time Ernest Hemingway was challenged to write a story using only six words. Impossible, some thought. Not for Papa, as Neal Conan explained on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation.” The next day Hemingway produced this: “For sale. Baby shoes. Never worn.”

Clare Booth Luce, according to columnist “Wall Street Journal” columnist Peggy Noonan, once told President John Kennedy that “a great man is one sentence.” Noonan writes that Lincoln’s life could be summed up as “He preserved the Union and freed the slaves.” My colleague, Scott Eblin, adapted the concept to summing up one’s leadership legacy. “It takes time and effort to boil down the essence of what you’re trying to do to a short and memorable idea.”

Read on…

Categories: Leadership, Leadership development, Personal development.

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The Four Keys

March 6, 2012

The Ken Blanchard Companies have found that in organizations where leading at a higher level is the rule rather than the exception, leaders do four things well.

  1. They set their sights on the right target and vision.
    Great organizations focus on three bottom lines instead of just one. In addition to financial success, leaders at great organizations know that measuring their success with people–both customers and employees–is just as important as measuring the success of their financial bottom line. In these organizations, developing loyal customers and engaged employees are considered equal to good financial performance. Leaders at these companies know that in order to succeed they must create a motivating environment for employees, which results in better customer service, which leads to higher profits.
  2. They treat their customers right.
    To keep your customers today, you can’t be content just to satisfy them. Instead, you have to create raving fans–customers who are so excited about the way you treat them that they want to tell everyone about you. Companies that create raving fans routinely do the unexpected on behalf of their customers, and then enjoy the growth generated by customers bragging about them to prospective clients.
  3. They treat their people right.
    Without committed and empowered employees, you can never provide good service. You can’t treat your people poorly and expect them to treat your customers well. Treating your people right begins with good performance planning that gets things going in the right direction by letting direct reports know what they will be held accountable for–goals–and what good behavior looks like–performance standards. It continues with managers who provide the right amount of direction and support that each individual employee needs in order to achieve those goals and performance standards.
  4. They have the right kind of leadership.
    The most effective leaders realize that leadership is not about them and that they are only as good as the people they lead. These leaders seek to be serving leaders instead of self-serving leaders. In this model, once a vision has been set, leaders move themselves to the bottom of the hierarchy, acting as a cheerleader, supporter, and encourager to the people who report to them.

Categories: Accountability, Attitude, Customer satisfaction, Employee engagement, Employee satisfaction, Leadership.

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